YUBA  COUNTY

Crimes & Criminals

(pre 1924)

If the walls of the Marysville City Jail and of the Yuba County Courthouse could speak, they could rehearse many sensational events of a criminal nature.  Crime started early to disturb the peace of the new settlement. 

One of the first crimes, a murder, is told of in a directory of Marysville compiled in 1856 by George Sturtevant and O. Amy.  During the summer of 1850, one Greenwood, a quarter-breed, killed one Holden, a gambler.  Much excitement prevailed, and Sheriff Twitchell with difficulty prevented the mob from taking Greenwood from his custody.

A few weeks later, one Keiger committed a cold-blooded murder in the street, in the daytime.  The populace was again aroused.  Passion prompted summary vengeance; but reason interposed, and the result was that a large volunteer guard watched the place used for a jail, then an adobe house at the foot of D Street, until Keiger could be examined before a magistrate, when he was committed and sent to a neighboring county jail to await his trial before a duly constituted court.

And so begins the history of our County's recorded crimes...  Others are listed below.

Ball, George
Bell, Tom
"Black Bart"
Brady, Jack & Browning, J. W.
Brice, Thomas
Brown, Tommie
Decker-Jewett
Dufficy, Dennis
Gray, Dr. J. B.
Heenan, Francis M.
Manwell, Edward T. & Riordan, Thomas
McDaniel, John
Mock, James
Picard, Emile & Ellen
Pier, Julius
Rideout, N. D.
Schindler, Fred
Shanks, George
Sperbeck, John
Webster, Jim
Williams, Charles

 

History of Yuba and Sutter Counties, Historic Record Company, Los Angeles

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Copyright ©2003, 2004, 2005  Kathy Sedler   ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons.  Persons or organizations desiring to use this material, must obtain the written consent of the contributor. The contributor has given permission to the Yuba Roots website to store the file permanently for free access, but retain the rights to their work.