YUBA COUNTY  Biographies

 


 

CHARLES R. BOYD, JR.

 

A young man of good business capacity, honest and honorable, is found in Charles R. Boyd, Jr., who holds a place among the leading horticulturists in the vicinity of Yuba City; since 1920 he has been general manager of the Boyd Farm Company, embracing 500 acres, eighty acres of which have been set to four varieties of cling peaches, seventy acres to three varieties of prune trees, seventy acres to Thompson Seedless grapes, and fifteen acres to wine grapes.  Twelve men are employed throughout the year, and during the rush season as many as fifty men are required to handle the fruit.  A fine concrete pipe irrigation system has been installed and the work of the ranch is carried on entirely by using tractors.  The birth of Charles R. Boyd, Jr., occurred at Yuba City, July 24, 1895, and he is the third in a family of four children born to Charles R. and Clara (Carpenter) Boyd, whose sketch may also be found in this history.  In 1914, Charles R. Boyd, Jr., was graduated from the Marysville high school.  On May 22, 1917 he enlisted in the United States Ambulance Corps and was sent to Allentown, Pa., where he remained for twenty months; he was discharged December 20, 1918, and reached his home at Yuba City on Christmas Day.  In 1919 Mr. Boyd attended the University Farm at Davis, Cal., for one term and early in 1920 took up his duties as general manager of the Boyd Farm Company.

The marriage of Mr. Boyd united him with Miss Geraldine Shepherd, born in Stockton, daughter of G. W. Shepherd, a pioneer resident, who has served for many years as deputy county treasurer of San Joaquin County.  Mr. and Mrs. Boyd are the parents of one daughter, Roberta.  While in college Mr. Boyd was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and fraternally he belongs to Marysville Lodge No. 783, B.P.O.E.  The Boyd Farm Company holds membership in the Barry Center of the Sutter County Farm Bureau.

 

History of Yuba and Sutter Counties, Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, 1924

p 1225

 


 

CLARENCE M. ALEXANDER

 

Wheatland, that claims the birth, on October 6, 1890, of Clarence M. Alexander, is worthily represented today by that enterprising and successful rancher who lives on his ranch of 675 acres some seven miles to the northeast of that town.  He is the son of William Allen and Mary (Melton) Alexander, natives respectively of Missouri and Iowa, and his father came to California about thirty-seven years ago.  Here, too, he married, and was a teamster and ranch-hand for some years, and for a while also had a small ranch.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Alexander are still living at Wheatland, enjoying the esteem and the good-will of all who know them.  Another son, Claude W., lives near them.

Clarence Alexander attended the Wheatland Grammar School, and the Wheatland High School.  At the age of twenty-one he started out for himself, first working in a store, where he learned a good deal about human nature; and then he studied Nature herself in the work of ranching.  In 1917, he moved onto his present ranch home, where he engaged in raising grain and stock.  He is a Democrat, but is an enthusiastic non-partisan “booster” for the locality to which he is naturally devoted.

At Marysville, on November 25, 1914, Mr. Alexander was married to Miss Susie M. Hutchinson, who was born at the old Hutchinson place seven miles north of Wheatland, the daughter of P. L. and Susie M. (Kuster) Hutchinson.  Mr. Alexander is a member of Sutter Lodge No. 100, I.O.O.F., of Wheatland, and is a Past Grand of the lodge there.  Both Mr. and Mrs. Alexander are deservedly popular, standing as they do for the better things in life, and first, last and all the time for the Golden State and its unrivaled Yuba County.

 

History of Yuba and Sutter Counties, Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, 1924

p 1226

 


BACK TO BIOGRAPHIES PAGE

Copyright ©2003, 2004, 2005  Kathy Sedler   ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by any other organization or persons.  Persons or organizations desiring to use this material, must obtain the written consent of the contributor. The contributor has given permission to the Yuba Roots website to store the file permanently for free access, but retain the rights to their work.