California  Civil War Rosters

 

From the book “Records of California Men in the War of the Rebellion, 1861 to 1867

by Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Orton, pub. 1890

Transcribed by © Kathy Sedler, June 2004,  pp 505-521.


 

THIRD REGIMENT OF INFANTRY

 

            This regiment was organized at Stockton and at Benicia Barracks, from October 31 to December 31, 1861, to serve three years.  On the expiration of its term of service, the original members (except veterans) were mustered out, and the veterans and recruits consolidated into a battalion of four companies on October 29, 1864, pursuant to S.O. No. 87, District of Utah, and was afterwards known as the Third Battalion of Infantry, comprising four companies, A, B, C, and D.  On December 9, 1865, Companies C and D were consolidated, leaving but three companies in the battalion.  The battalion was finally mustered out July 27, 1866.  After the formation of the regiment at Stockton, four companies were sent to Humboldt County during the month of November, 1861.  During the month of July, 1862, Colonel Connor was sent, with his regiment, to Salt Lake City, in the vicinity of which it was on duty the balance of its term.  The regiment was first commanded by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor.  He was promoted Brigadier-General of Volunteers, March 30, 1863, and Brevet Major-General, March 13, 1865, and was succeeded in command by Colonel Robert Pollock, who was mustered out November 14, 1864; he afterwards became Lieutenant-Colonel of Second California Infantry; afterwards an officer in the regular army.  The following correspondence explains the nature of its service:

 

[EXTRACT]

 

HEADQUARTERS HUMBOLDT MILITARY DISTRICT,

FORT HUMBOLDT, May 20, 1862.

Maj. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific, U.S. Army:

                MAJOR:  The following is a summary of operations against the Indians in my district since my last dispatch in April last:

                On the sixth of April, Captain Ketcham, with a scouting party of Company A, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, found near Yager Creek the rancheria of the Indians that had previously robbed Cooper’s Mills of two thousand five hundred pounds of flour.   The Indians had just fled, leaving some seven hundred pounds of the flour, together with belting from the mill, mill files, baskets, bullets, lead, shot pouches, bullet molds, etc., all  of which articles were burned, there being no means of packing them.

                On the sixteenth of April, a detachment of five men of Company E, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, stationed near Cooper’s Mills, on Yager Creek, reinforced by four or five citizens, went in pursuit of a band of some forty Indians that had robbed the mills of some three thousand three hundred pounds of flour the night before.  After a very difficult march to the northward, of ten miles, they came upon a rancheria, where they found the flour, having no means of packing, they destroyed, together with the lodges and their contents.  No Indians were seen, as they had all fled on the approach of the party.

                During a scout of Company F, Second Infantry, California Volunteers, commenced April second, by Lieutenant Flynn, three Indians near Trinidad, going towards the mouth of Redwood Creek, where, it was reported, there was a band of some two hundred hostile Indians, were captured by him.  to prevent their giving the band notice of his approach, after being fully warned of the consequences of their attempting to escape, they suddenly broke and ran in the same direction they were going when taken.  Lieutenant Flynn, who had no one with him but the guide, instantly fired at them with his pistol.  One was killed on the spot, the two others escaped, one of them with a bullet through his head.

                On the twenty-seventh of April, Captain Ketcham, of Company A, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, returned to Fort Baker, from a scout to the southward of Van Dusen Fork, with twenty-four Indian prisoners, all women and children, except two young bucks.  In attacking the rancheria, four Indians were killed, including a squaw, shot by mistake.  During the scout, Captain Ketcham came upon a rancheria, which had been fortified by piles of logs around it, but which the Indians had deserted.

                On the same day, Lieutenant Staples, with a detachment of the same company, came upon a large band of Indians by surprise (having previously managed to kill their scout or sentinel without giving the alarm); killed fifteen of them and took forty prisoners, three of whom he left behind, being unable to travel.

                On the seventh of May, instant, Captain Ketcham, reported eleven Indians as having come in at Fort Baker – eight bucks and three squaws.  He sent out two of them as runners to bring in as many more as possible, assuring them (under my instructions to that effect) of protection.

   *          *          *          *          *           *           *           *            *           *           *            *            *          

                (Signed:)

FRANCIS J. LIPPITT,

Colonel, Second Infantry, California Volunteers.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, May 30, 1862.

                GENERAL:  Since I received instructions from your office to prepare a command for the protection of the overland mail route, I have received no instructions as to how far east it was intended that I should send my troops.  Colonel P.E. Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, whom I appointed to command all the troops on the mail route has advanced with seven companies of his regiment, and is now encamped near Stockton.  Supplies are being collected and transportation preparing for crossing the Sierra Nevada, as soon as the roads are practicable for wagons, probably about the twentieth of June.  I have two companies of cavalry at Fort Churchill, and one company near Pyramid Lake, which, with the two companies of the same regiment, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, now near this city, will constitute the mounted force I designed for Colonel Connor’s command.  Three companies of the Third Infantry, California Volunteers, are now serving in the District of Humboldt.  I propose, as soon as their services can be spared, to order them to join Colonel Connor.  At present there seems to be no danger apprehended on the mail route between here and Salt Lake.  Unless otherwise instructed, I shall advance Colonel Connor to the neighborhood of Salt Lake, establishing one, possibly two, intermediate stations between Fort Churchill and Utah.  Colonel Connor has with him two field pieces and mountain howitzers, with equipments and ammunition.

                                With great respect, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L.THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, June 28, 1862.

                GENERAL:  On the twenty-sixth instant I reviewed and inspected the Third Infantry, California Volunteers, commanded by Colonel P.E. Connor, encamped near Stockton.  The regiment made a very fine appearance; the arms, clothing, and equipments were in high order.  The industry and untiring zeal and energy of Colonel Connor is manifest throughout.  He has a regiment that the State may well be proud of.  Colonel Connor has a field battery of four guns in fine order, which he will take with him on his march to Salt Lake.  The Colonel will march on the fifth proximo.

                I am preparing the headquarters and two companies of the Second Cavalry, under Colonel Sims, now encamped at Camp Alert, near this city, to follow the movement of Colonel Connor, in connection with forces destined for the protection of the overland mail route.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., July 18, 1862.

                GENERAL:  I have nothing later from Brigadier-General James H. Carleton than was communicated in my letters of the ninth and tenth instant.

                Inclosed herewith is a copy of a communication under date of June second, addressed to General Carleton by his Excellency Ignacio Pesqueira, Governor of the State of Sonora, in the Republic of Mexico.

                Colonel P. Edward Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, marched on the twelfth instant, from his camp near Stockton, with seven companies of his regiment, for the protection of the overland mail route.  The cavalry force designated for the same service will move on the twenty-first instant, and report to Colonel Connor after crossing the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., July 25, 1862.

                GENERAL:  Colonel Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, with his regiment, has passed the Sierra and is probably now in the vicinity of Carson City, Nev.  Colonel Sims, with headquarters and two companies Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, left this city on the twenty-first instant, and are now advancing on the overland mail route, and will join Colonel Connor beyond the mountains.  This force, with the addition of one company of cavalry from Fort Churchill, will move forward and establish a post at Ruby Valley and another in the vicinity of Salt Lake, the latter to be the headquarters of Colonel Connor.  Supplies for a year are being thrown forward for all the troops on the mail route, including Fort Churchill.

                In the District of Oregon all is quiet.  The headquarters of the First Infantry, Washington Territory, Colonel Steinberger commanding, have been established at Fort Walla Walla.  The Oregon cavalry companies at Walla Walla were ordered to move on the fifteenth of July, on the emigrant road, to meet the approaching emigration and afford them protection through the Indian country.

                In the District of Humboldt Indian difficulties still continue; the troops have been zealous and indefatigable in their exertions, and more than four hundred Indians have been captured and brought into Fort Humboldt, and await the action of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for their removal to some reservation.

                The Indian difficulties on Owens Lake and River, and Mono Lake, on the eastern borders of this State, have nearly terminated, and it is expected that a permanent peace may be soon established.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., September 1, 1862.

                GENERAL:  Colonel Connor, with seven companies of Third Infantry, California Volunteers, and three companies Second Cavalry, will reach Ruby Valley to-day, en route for Salt Lake.  The command is in good health, and under the admirable discipline established by Colonel Connor, is perfectly reliable for any service required of it.  From Brigadier-General Carleton I have no late official reports.  He has a fine body of troops, probably now on the Rio Grande; I shall continue to throw forward supplies to meet all his wants.  From the District of Oregon I have nothing special to report; all is quiet in the Indian country, and a strong cavalry force is on the road to protect the approaching overland emigration.  In the District of Humboldt, the Indian disturbances still continue.  The troops under Colonel Lippitt, Second Infantry, California Volunteers, are vigorously prosecuting hostilities; many Indians have been killed, and we have now some eight hundred at the different military stations, who have either been captured or who have voluntarily surrendered.  The Superintendent of Indian Affairs has made arrangements to have all these Indians placed on a reservation on Smith River, in the northwest section of the State of California.  The steamer which leaves here on the fifth instant will transport the Indians to Crescent City, near which point I have a battalion of the Second Infantry, California Volunteers, to take charge of them.  I have brought down from Oregon the residue of the Second Infantry, California Volunteers, and sent them to service in the District of Humboldt.  I have also brought down from Humboldt the three companies of the Third Infantry, California Volunteers (Connor’s regiment), preparatory to their movement in the direction of Salt Lake.  The Washington Territory regiment, Colonel Steinberger, is doing well.  Six full companies have been raised here; five of them are now in the District of Oregon, and the sixth will go up on the next steamer.  I have never received any special instructions as to the disposition of the forces I designated for the protection of the overland mail route, but I have assumed it as a matter of course that the route between this and Salt Lake City came under my special supervision, and have acted accordingly.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

 

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

FORT RUBY, NEV., September 14, 1862.

                MAJOR:  I have the honor to report my return to this post from Salt Lake last evening.  I am glad I made the journey, as it will be the means of saving my command much suffering for want of water. 

                The country between this place and Salt Lake is an alkali desert, scarce of wood and water, but I have made such arrangements as will enable me to take my command over with comparative comfort.

                It will be impossible for me to describe what I saw and heard in Salt Lake, so as to make you realize the enormity of Mormonism; suffice it, that I found them a community of traitors, murderers, fanatics, and whores.  The people publicly rejoice at reverses to our arms, and thank God that the American Government is gone, as they term it, while their prophet and bishops preach treason from the pulpit.  The Federal officers are entirely powerless, and talk in whispers, for fear of being overheard by Brigham’s spies.  Brigham Young rules with despotic sway, and death by assassination is the penalty of disobedience to his commands.

                I have a difficult and dangerous task before me, and will endeavor to act with prudence and firmness.  I examined the country in the vicinity of the city to find a suitable location for a post.

                Fort Crittenden (Camp Floyd) is in ruins, except the few buildings of which I send you a description, and for which the owner asks $15,000.  There are also some buildings  purchased by and belonging to the Overland Mail Company, and now occupied by them, but which are not for sale.  Of the remaining buildings there is nothing left but the adobes, except two or three buildings owned by former sutlers, which are in tolerable repair, and could be purchased cheap.  If it were designed to establish a permanent post, most of the buildings would have to be torn down and removed, as many of them are half a mile from the officers’ quarters, or what was known as headquarters.

                The latter buildings are the only ones in tolerable repair; the others require doors, windows, and considerable work to place them in habitable order.  The land is considered a Government reserve, but the post is badly located, being on the edge of the reserve and adjoining a small village, inhabited by a class of persons of questionable character.  There is good grazing on the reserve, which is the only redeeming quality, in my opinion, it has.  There are sufficient adobes on the ground to erect such additional buildings as I may require, but good timber is scarce, and the sawmills are sixty miles distant.

                I found another location, which I like better for various reasons, which I shall explain.  It is on a plateau about three miles from Salt Lake City, in the vicinity of good timber and sawmills, and at a point where hay, grain, and other produce can be purchased cheaper than at Fort Crittenden.  It is also a point which commands the city, and where one thousand troops would be more efficient than three thousand on the other side of the Jordan.  If the General decides that I shall locate there, I intend to quietly intrench my position, and then say to the Saints of Utah, enough of your treason; but if it is intended that I shall merely protect the overland mail and permit the Mormons to act and utter treason, then I had as well locate at Crittenden.

                The Federal officers desire and beg that I will locate near the city.  The Governor especially is very urgent in the matter.  It is certainly rather late in the season to build quarters, but I believe I could make my command comfortable before very cold weather sets in.

                It is raining here now, and snowing on the surrounding mountains.  It is important that I should know the General’s decision as soon as possible, as winter is fast approaching.  Communication by mail or telegraph will, until my arrival at Salt Lake, reach me earlier by being directed to Ruby Valley than to any other point.

                                I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Colonel Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Commanding District of Utah.

Maj. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT O FTHE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18, 1862.

                GENERAL:  I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a letter from Colonel P.E. Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, commanding the District of Utah, dated November 6, 1862, also a copy of the report of Major E. McGarry, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, detailing the result of his expedition to capture guerrillas and punish Indians engaged in the late massacres on the Humboldt River.  The swift retributive punishment which has been meted out to those Indians will doubtless have the effect of preventing a repetition of their barbarities.  It is the only way to deal with those savages.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH, November 20, 1862

                MAJOR:  You will proceed this P.M., with a detachment of sixty men of your command, to Cache Valley, at which point are encamped Bear Hunter’s tribe of Snake and Bannock Indians, who, I am credibly informed, have in their possession an emigrant boy, about ten years of age, whose parents were murdered last summer by Indians.  The boy’s uncle is at present at Cache Valley, and will guide you to where the boy is.  You will march by night, and by a trail which will be shown you by a guide who will accompany your command.  Surround the Indians, if possible, before they become aware of your presence, and hold them prisoners while you send a part of your men to a valley about two miles from the Indian camp, where, I am told, there is a large number of stock stolen from murdered emigrants, which, if you have reason to believe the my information is correct, you will drive to this post.  You will search the Indian camp thoroughly for the emigrant boy, and if you should not find him you demand him of the Indians, and if not given up you will bring three of their principal men to this post as hostages.  You will also investigate as to their complicity in the massacres of last summer, and if you have reason to believe any of them are guilty you will bring all such to this post for trial.  You will not fire upon the Indians unless you find it necessary to the proper execution of your instructions.

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Colonel Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Commanding District.

Maj. E. McGARRY, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH, December 2, 1862.

                COLONEL:  I have the honor to inclose a letter of instruction to Major McGarry, and his report of the expedition upon which he was sent.  The uncle of the boy, who is now at this post, is a resident of Oregon, and, as he informs me, has been in search of the boy for two years.  Three sisters of his, who were captured at the same time, are dead.  He also informs me that three expeditions had previously been sent out from Oregon for the recovery of the children, one of which was under command of Captain Dent, of the Ninth Infantry.

                The Indians are threatening the overland mail route east and west of here.  I have no fears of the western end, as the lessons I have been teaching them and the messages I send them make them fear me.  About a week since I sent ten men to protect the telegraph station at Big Sandy, which was threatened by Indians.  On Saturday last they stole one hundred horses from Fort Bridger Reserve, belonging to some mountaineers, who are wintering there; and fears are entertained that they will attack some of the stations of the overland mail.

                I have therefore ordered Company I, Captain Lewis, of my regiment, to garrison Fort Bridger this winter.  I shall order detachments of his company to the different stations in this district, east of here, if I find it will be necessary.  Pacific Springs Station, lately attacked by the Indians, is just east of the line, dividing this district and the Department of the West, and has been garrisoned by troops from that department.  The telegraph station at Big Sandy is in the District of Oregon.  I shall leave the ten men there at that point until I am satisfied there is no further danger from the Indians, unless otherwise ordered.

                                I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Colonel Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Commanding District.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.

 

            The establishment of the Third Infantry in the vicinity of Salt Lake City seemed to have aroused the ire of the Mormon leaders, and the following correspondence is inserted in this place as part of the history of the Third Infantry, for the purpose of showing the difficult and dangerous duties the regiment was required to perform:

 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, March 14, 1863.

                GENERAL:  Within the last ten days affairs in Utah have assumed a threatening aspect.  My latest dispatch from Colonel Connor, dated on the twelfth, says that Brigham Young hoisted a signal flag that day, and assembled fifteen hundred armed men; they were subsequently dismissed, but Mormon guards patrol the city nightly.  Colonel Connor is impressed with the belief that they are courting an attack by his forces; that they do not wish to take the initiative, but will do all in their power to provoke a combat.  I have telegraphed to Connor to be prudent and cautious.  He has a commanding position, with ample supplies.  As soon as the roads are passable I will throw forward the residue of Connor’s regiment and such other troops as can be spared.

                I have directed Colonel Connor to telegraph directly to you anything very important.  We are raising the additional regiment of infantry and the seven companies of cavalry, but the recruiting is slow.  The greatest embarrassment is the want of funds.  We cannot possibly get along on this coast without specie.  With treasury notes fluctuating in value, frequently at a discount of 50 per cent, it is impossible to make contracts, and when purchases are made we pay nearly double the price.  Arrangements are being made to throw forward troops and supplies in the early spring for the establishment of a post at Fort Boise, on Snake River, under the immediate supervision and orders of Brigadier-General Alvord, commanding the District of Oregon.  I am also making preparations to establish a post at the Klamath Lakes, in Oregon.  With the exception of Indian disturbances in the District of Humboldt, and on Owens River, Camp Independence, the country is quiet.

                I am advancing the Fifth Infantry, California Volunteers, under Colonel Bowie, into the Territory of Arizona, and the Fourth Infantry, California Volunteers, will occupy the southern portion of California, including Fort Yuma.  General Carleton asked for reinforcements, and I deem it important to secure both Arizona and Mesilla from being again overrun by the Rebel hordes, that a respectable force should occupy these districts; and another object I have in view is to keep an eye on the neighboring States of the Mexican Republic, where most of the disaffected of this State go.

                The Legislature of this State is still in session at Sacramento.  A bill is now pending, which will doubtless become a law, appropriating $600,000 to place the State on a war footing.  On the eighteenth instant I shall review and inspect Major Thompson’s battalion of four companies of cavalry; they will sail for New York on the steamer of the twenty-first.

                                With great respect, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH,

March 15, 1863.

                COLONEL:  I have the honor to communicate, for the information of the General commanding, the following facts in relation to the extraordinary proceedings of the people of the Territory during the last twelve days.  On Tuesday, the third instant, an excited meeting was held in the Mormon Tabernacle, in Salt Lake City, at which resolutions were passed asking his Excellency Governor Harding, and Associate Justices Drake and Waite, to resign and leave the Territory.

                The reason they gave for this action is that those gentlemen caused a bill to be presented before Congress which they say is inimicable to their interests; but I have reason to believe that such is not their real cause of grievance, and that because those gentlemen do not choose to become the tools and creatures of Brigham Young, and follow in the footsteps of ex-Governor Cummings, the present Chief Justice Kinney, and the present Secretary of State, Frank Fuller, is the real cause of this action against them.  The latter officers, Messrs. Kinney and Fuller, disgrace their commissions and the Government they represent, and I unhesitatingly assert, that while the former Chief Justice, Kinney, holds his office, no conviction can be had before his Court against a Mormon unless Brigham Young would sanction such conviction.  This appears strong language, but the assertions are susceptible of proof, and manifest to every resident and loyal citizen of the Territory.

                On Tuesday, the third, and between the hours of 10 P.M. and 3 A.M. of the fourth instant, Brigham Young caused to be removed from the Territorial arsenal to his residence all the ordnance and ordnance stores, and placed a large body of armed men in his yard, which in inclosed with a high stone wall.  On Monday, the ninth, he raised the national flag over his residence, for the first time, I am told, since his arrival in the Territory, but not, however, from motives of patriotism, or for any loyal purpose, but as a signal to his people to assemble armed, which they immediately did, to the number of about one thousand five hundred.  The same farce was performed again on the twelfth instant, and the only excuse his adherents give for this extraordinary proceeding is that he feared I would arrest him for uttering treasonable language, but, in my opinion, that is not the true cause, as there has been nothing in my conduct or language which could be construed so as to induce that belief, further than what I said when I first entered the Territory, to the effect that “any person, whosoever he might be, who was guilty of using treasonable language, would be arrested and sent to Alcatraz Island.”  Since my arrival the people of the Territory have been treated kindly and courteously by both my officers and men, who have never given one of them cause for complaint, which the people freely acknowledge.  But, notwithstanding this, the courtesy we have given is returned with abuse; they rail at us in their sermons, in which we are also classed with cut-throats and gamblers, our Government cursed and vilified in their public speeches and meetings, and those of their people who supply this camp with vegetables, eggs, butter, and produce are proscribed and shamefully abused for extending such favors.  The late armed display was a mere ruse to frighten the proscribed Federal officers from the Territory; or else they desire to have a conflict with the Government, and are endeavoring to provoke me into inaugurating it; the latter I believe to be the real motive, however Brigham Young may try to disguise the fact.

                As evidence to substantiate the latter belief, he made use of the following language in a speech delivered at the Tabernacle on Monday, the third instant:  “Joseph Smith told me thirty years ago that these prophecies were bound to come true.  He hoped they would.  He would like to live in Heaven with the Government of the United States, but he had no desire to live with a people who had brought ruin and disgrace upon their own heads.  He would not live with or have anything to do with the United States.  He would have a free and independent Government to himself, where he could enjoy his civil and religious liberties.  That Smith had told him that the South would rise against the North, and the North against the South, and that they would fight until both parties were destroyed, and for my part give it God-speed, for they shed the blood of the prophet.”

                And on Sunday, the eighth instant, he said: “Is there anything we would not do to show our loyalty to the Government?  Yes; if the present administration should ask us  for one thousand men, or even five hundred, to go down there (meaning to fight the Rebels), I would see them damned first, and then they could not have them while these soldiers are in our vicinity.”

                And at the same place, and on the same day, Heber Kimball, second President of the Mormon Church, said: “We can defy the whole Federal Government.”  To which the congregation responded, “That’s so, we can.”

                The people are, by order of Brigham Young, busily engaged in preparing ammunition and cannon, and their foundry for some weeks past has been used for casting cannon-balls; they also loudly assert that I shall not be reinforced, and that if the attempt is made they will cut off the reinforcements in detail and attack me.  The law against polygamy is a dead letter on the statute books; Brigham has lately violated it, and boasts that he will have as many wives as he desires, and advises his people to pursue the same course.  American citizens, who are not Mormons, cannot hold real estate in the Territory, and those who undertake to do so are abused and threatened, their property stolen, or confiscated by the Mormon Courts upon a charge manufactured for the occasion.  I have applications daily from people of the Mormon faith who desire to leave the Territory, and who say they cannot do so without protection form me, as they fear they would be arrested, their property taken from them on some trumped-up charge, and probably their lives taken.  They have ample grounds for their fears, for such has been the fate of many a poor wretch who dared to apostatize and leave the Mormon Church.  Yesterday morning Brigham Young started for the northern settlements with a guard of one hundred and fifty mounted men.  Previous to starting they were drawn up in front of his residence, and as the Governor’s son, who is also his Private Secretary, was passing, some of them shouted:  “Three cheers for ex-Governor Harding, and long life to Jeff. Davis.”  Companies are drilled daily and exercised in target practice.

                I had contemplated and have all preparations made for another expedition against the Indians, this being the best and most favorable season for that service, for the reason that in the summer the Indians scatter so in the mountains that it is impossible to make a successful campaign against them.  But in consequence of the hostile attitude of the Mormons, I will be compelled to forego such duty for the season.

                This is a plain and brief statement of the facts as they exist here, and, unless reinforced, as I have requested in a former communication, I would respectfully recommend that my command be withdrawn from the Territory, and the Mormons be left to further preparations of their infamous conduct until such time as the Government can spare the number of troops required to forever put a stop to their outrageous, unnatural, and treasonable institutions.  My command is in no immediate danger, but if the present preparations of the Mormons should continue, I will be compelled, for the preservation of my command, to strike at the heads of the Church, which I can do with safety, for, they being once in my power, their followers will not dare touch me; but if I remain in my present position (although a strong one), for them to attack me, I am lost, as they have about five thousand men capable of bearing arms, and cannon of heavier caliber than mine.  In any event, the General commanding can rest assured that I will do nothing rashly or hastily, and my intercourse with them will be, as heretofore, courteous and firm.

                I herewith inclose the replies of his Excellency Governor Harding, and Judges Waite and Drake, to the Mormon committee who waited upon them the day after the meeting of the third instant.

                                I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Colonel Third Infantry, California Volunteers, Commanding District.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.

 

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

SAN FRANCISCO, March 30, 1863.

                GENERAL:  I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the consideration of the General-in-Chief and War Department, a communication dated on the fifteenth instant, and addressed to my headquarters by Colonel P.E. Connor, Third Infantry, California Volunteers, commanding at Camp Douglas, Utah Territory, together with the remarks of Brigham Young on the third of March, and the replies of Governor Harding and Judges Drake and Waite to the Mormon committee who waited upon those gentlemen and presented the resolutions passed by the mass meeting held on the third instant, requesting them to resign and leave the Territory.

                The astounding developments exhibited in these documents demand serious consideration and prompt action to enforce obedience to our laws, and to sustain and support the officers of the general Government in the proper discharge of their duties.  Although the excitement at Great Salt Lake City, brought about by the treasonable acts of Brigham Young and his adherents, has somewhat subsided, yet I am fully satisfied that they only wait for a favorable opportunity to strike a blow against the Union.  When Colonel Connor approached Salt Lake City he submitted to me the question as to the location of his camp.

                Brigham Young was exceedingly anxious that the troops should occupy Camp Crittenden, or some point remote from the city, but after mature consideration I came to the conclusion that the site of the present camp was the most eligible for the accomplishment of the objects in view.  It is a commanding position, looking down on the city, and hence has been dreaded by the Mormon Chief.  The good order and strict discipline enforced by Colonel Connor have left the people of the city without any cause of complaint, on account of the proximity of the troops; but they have, doubtless, great apprehension that their odious institutions, so repugnant to civilized society, may receive a check by the presence of a large body of loyal men sworn to maintain the laws and authority of the United States.

                Colonel Connor has a strong position and is in no immediate danger, and I shall throw forward reinforcements as soon as they can be procured; as they advance towards Salt Lake the command will be increased by the addition of such troops as can be spared from the posts east of the Sierra Nevada.

                By late telegraphic dispatches I am advised of attacks on two or three of the overland mail stations by Indians beyond Ruby Valley.  Detachments of cavalry from Salt Lake and Fort Churchill have been ordered along the line to punish the offenders and protect the mail; the cavalry company from Fort Churchill will then unite with other troops en route for Salt Lake.  Captain Selfridge, commandant of the Navy Yard at Mare Island, having received information that an organization existed in Solano County, composed of Rebel sympathizers, with the purpose of seizing the yard and destroying the public property, recalled the steamer “Saginaw,” then lying in the harbor of San Francisco, and on the eve of departure on a cruise south, as I reported some days since.  A feverish anxiety exists in the public mind that organizations inimical to the Government are prepared and will strike when an opportunity offers a fair prospect of success; I shall take care that no such opportunity is presented.

                                Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army, Commanding.

Brig.-Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

 

 

Remarks of Brigham Young, March 3, 1863, not Published in “Deseret News” of March 4, 1863.

 

                Of the Governor he said:

                “Let him go back to his (Governor Harding’s) friends, if he have any.  He has none, either in Heaven or hell, or anywhere else.

                “This man who is sent here to govern the Territory – man, did I say?  thing, I mean; a nigger worshiper, a black-hearted abolitionist is what he is, and what he represents, and these two things I do utterly despise – he wants to have the telegraph torn down and the mail stopped and turned by way of Panama.  And to the people he said: ‘Do you acknowledge this man Harding as Governor?’  (Voices) ‘No; you are our Governor.’  ‘Yes,’ said he (Brigham), ‘I am your Governor.  Will you allow such a man to remain in the Territory?’  (Voices) ‘No; put him out.’  ‘Yes,’ replied Brigham, ‘put him out; Harding and Drake and Waite must leave the Territory.  If they will not resign, and if the President will not remove them, the people must attend to it.  I will let him (Harding) know who is Governor.  I am Governor.  If he attempts to interfere with my affairs, woe, woe, unto him.’”

                Of the Judges he said:

                “Judges Drake and Waite are perfect fools and tools for the Governor.  If they could get the power, as they want to do, to have the Marshal choose juries of cut-throats, black-legs, soldiers, and desperadoes of California, and if we are to be tried by such men, what would become of us?”

 

Reply of his Excellency Governor Harding to the Mormon Committee who waited upon him, Presented the Resolutions passed by the Mass Meeting held on the third instant, and Requested him to Resign and Leave the Territory.

 

                Having stated the object of this visit, the Governor replied to them, in substance, as follows:

                “Gentlemen, I believe that I understand this matter perfectly.  You may go back and tell your constituents that I will not resign my office of Governor, and that I will not leave this Territory until it shall please the President to send me away.  I came here a messenger of peace and good will to your people; but I confess that my opinions about many things have changed.  But I came also, sirs, to discharge my duties honestly and faithfully to my Government, and I will do it to the last.  It is in your power to do me personal violence, to shed my blood, but this will not deter me from my purpose.  If the President can be made to believe that I have acted wrongfully, that I have been unfaithful to the trust that he has confided to me, he will doubtless remove me; then I shall be glad to return to my family and home in the States, and will do so, carrying with me no unjust resentments towards you or anybody else.  But I will not be driven away.  I will not cowardly desert my post.  I may be in danger by staying, but my mind is fixed.

                “I desire to have no trouble, I am anxious to live and again meet my family, but if necessary an administrator can settle my affairs.  Let me now say to you, sirs, in conclusion, and as this is said to be a band of prophets, I too will prophecy:  If one drop of my blood is shed by your ministers of vengeance while I am in the discharge of my duty, it will be avenged, and not one stone or adobe in your city will remain upon another.  Your allegations in this paper are false, without the shadow of truth.  You condemn my message as an insult to you, and yet you dare not publish it for fear that your judgment will not be sustained by the people themselves.  That I have done you wrong in representing you to the Government as disloyal is simply preposterous.  Your people, public teachers, and bishops have, time and time again, admitted the fact.  I an now done, sirs, and you understand me.”

 

Reply of his Honor Judge Drake, on the Same Occasion.

 

                He said:  “The communications you have made are of some importance, as they are intended to affect me.  I desire to say something before you go.  It is no small thing to request a citizen to leave a country.  Are you aware of the magnitude of the business you have undertaken?  I deny that you have any cause for such conduct towards me.  I am an American citizen, have a right to go to any part of the Republic.  I have a right to petition or ask this Government to amend the laws or pass laws.  You, Taylor and Pratt, are men of experience and reputed to be men of learning, and ought to know better than to insult a man by such means.  That it is mean and contemptible.  That on your part, Taylor, a foreigner, it is impudence unequaled, and Pratt, a citizen, ought to know better then to trample on the rights of a citizen by performing such a dirty enterprise.”  Judge Drake said:  “Your resolutions are false, and the man that drafted them knew it to be so, and I further understand that Brigham Young, in the meeting at the Tabernacle, called me a fool and a tool of the Governor.”  Here  Taylor admitted that Young did so say.  The Judge then said:  “Go back to Brigham Young, your master, that embodiment of sin and shame and disgust, and tell him that I neither fear him nor love him nor hate him, but that I utterly despise.  Tell him, whose tools and tricksters you are, that I did not come here by his permission, and that I will not go away at his desire or by his directions.  I have given no cause of offense to any one, I have not entered a Mormon house since I came here, your wives and daughters have not been disturbed by me, and I have not even looked upon your concubines or lewd women.  I am no skulk from the punishment of crimes.

                “I tell you, if your or this man you so faithfully serve attempt to interfere with my lawful business, you will meet with trouble of a character you do not expect.  A horse thief or a murderer has, when arrested, a right to speak in Court, and, unless in such capacity, and such circumstances, don’t you ever dare to speak to me again.”

 

Reply of Judge Waite to the Committee, on the Same Occasion.

 

                “To comply with your wishes, gentlemen, under such circumstances, would be to admit impliedly, at least, one of two things:  Either that I am sensible of having done something wrong, or that I was afraid to remain at my post and perform my duty.  I am not conscious either of guilt or fear.  I am, therefore, obliged respectfully to decline acceding to your request.”

 

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, October 26, 1863.

                COLONEL:  In former communications I have had the honor to fully set forth my views to the Department Commander relative to the condition of the Mormon people and the sentiments of their leaders, and have endeavored to present my opinions as to the settlement of the Mormon question, so far as it has necessarily thrust itself upon me in the performance of strictly military duties.  I need hardly repeat that it has been my constant endeavor to maintain amicable relations with the people and avoid conflict, so far as compatible with the strict and proper fulfillment of the obligations resting upon me.  Fully understanding that it is no part of my business to interfere with the religious tenets, or even the illegal practices of this peculiar people, except when called upon by the civil authorities, the open declaration of hostility to the Government on the part of their public men, and their bold, continued, and unceasing teachings of disloyalty, have time and again tended to produce excitements leading to collision, which have only been avoided by the most temperate and moderate courses of the officers and men of my command.  Until such time, therefore, as the Government, in the interest of humanity and the vindication of its offended dignity and laws, shall deem it advisable to inaugurate by force an observance of its recorded laws, and come to the relief of a people oppressed and downtrodden by a most galling church tyranny, my own course had been plainly marked by the dictates of policy and the manifest necessity of the case.

                Entertaining the opinion that Mormonism, as preached and practiced in this Territory, is not only subversive of morals, in conflict with the civilization of the present age, and oppressive on the people, but also deeply and boldly in contravention of the laws and bests interests of the nation, I have sought, by every proper means in my power, to arrest its progress and prevent its spread.  As a question for the civilian, I can conceive of but two ways at striking at its root and annihilating its baneful influence.  The one, by an adequate military force, acting under martial law and punishing, with a strong hand, every infraction of law or loyalty; the other, by inviting into the Territory large numbers of Gentiles to live among and dwell with the people.  The former, I am aware, is at the present time impracticable, even though it were deemed advisable.  The latter, if practicable, is perhaps, in any event, the wiser course.  With these remarks I desire to inform the Department Commander that I have considered the discovery of gold, silver, and other valuable minerals in the Territory of the highest importance, and as presenting the only prospect of bringing hither such a population as is desirable or possible.  The discovery of such mines would unquestionably induce and immigration to the Territory of a hardy, industrious, and enterprising population, as could not but result in the happiest effects, and, in my opinion, presents the only sure means of settling peaceably the “Mormon question.”  Their presence and intercourse with the people already here would greatly tend to disabuse the minds of the latter of the false, frivolous, yet dangerous and constant teachings of the leaders that the Government is their enemy and persecutor for opinion’s sake.

                As I have said, these doctrines are continually being preached to them, until the mass of the people believe that the Government, instead of desiring their welfare, seeks their destruction.  To the end, then, that the inducements to come hither may be presented to the teeming populations of the East and West, seeking new fields of exploration and prosperity, I have looked upon the discovery of the mines in this Territory as in the highest degree important, first to this people, and secondly to the Government, for the reasons stated.  Having reason to believe that the Territory is full of mineral wealth, I have instructed commanders of posts and detachments to permit the men of their commands to prospect the country in the vicinity of their respective posts whenever such course would not interfere with their military duties, and to furnish every proper facility for the discovery and opening of mines of gold, silver, and other minerals.  The results, so far, have exceeded my most sanguine expectations.  Already reliable reports reach me of the discovery of rich gold, silver, and copper mines in almost every direction, and that by spring one of the largest and most hopeful fields for mining operations will be opened to the hardy and adventurous of our people.  Both gold quartz and silver leads have been discovered at Egan Canon, about two hundred miles west of this place; also, in Ruby Valley, and at points along the mail route.  The Goose Creek Mountains, one hundred and fifty miles northwest of this city, are believed to contain rich mines of precious metals.  The mountains in the immediate vicinity of this place are being explored and prospected, and I have reason to believe with successful results.  Already within a distance of from twenty-five to fifty miles of this city, in the east and west mountains, mines have been discovered yielding, with imperfect tests, rich indications of silver, and largely charged with lead and copper ores.  The work is still going on, and I have little doubt that rich veins of silver, and probably gold, will be discovered in almost every direction, and still nearer to Great Salt Lake City.

                I may also mention that near Camp Connor, one hundred and fifty miles north of this place, large deposits of salt, sulphur, and extensive beds of coal have been found, while the springs adjoining the camp yield immense deposits of the carbonate of soda, which will one day, I  have no doubt, be of very considerable commercial value.  If I be not mistaken in these anticipations, I have no reason to doubt that the “Mormon question” will at an early day be finally settled by peaceable means without the increased expenditure of a dollar by the Government, or still more important, without the loss of a single soldier in conflict.  I have every confidence, therefore, in being able to accomplish this desirable result without the aid of another soldier in addition to those already under my command, notwithstanding the obstacles sought to be thrown in my way by the Mormon leaders, who see in the present policy the sure downfall of their most odious church system of tyranny.  I have no fear for the future, and believe the dawn is breaking upon this deluded people, even though their elders, and bishops, and chief priests may escape the personal punishment their sins against law and crimes against humanity and the Government so richly merit.

                                I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, U.S.Volunteers, Commanding District.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, San Francisco, Cal

 

 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH,

CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH, February 15, 1864.

                GENERAL:  I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a certified copy of a communication addressed through the General-in-Chief to the Hon. Secretary of War by Hon. J.T. Kinney, Delegate from Territory of Utah, transmitted to me for report, and to submit the following as my views on the several subjects contained in the communication referred to:

                In regard to the first point made by Mr. Kinney, relating to the location of Camp Douglas, I am not apprised whether the camp is within the limits of Great Salt Lake City, as the authorities may have chosen to prescribe in a charter, or describe in an ordinance.  For aught I know to the contrary, the Territorial or city authorities may have extended their city jurisdiction on paper over the whole tract of country from the mountains to the Jordan.  It was and is a question which has occasioned me neither to make careful inquiry nor to exercise much consideration.  I recognized the supreme authority of the United States as existing here, however little it may be respected by the leaders of the masses of the people, and established my camp on what is unquestionably public domain, never reduced to adverse possession by cities, towns, or private persons, so far as I am aware.  I did not recognize the right, now claimed, of the Legislature or city to embrace a vast region of country for city or any other purpose antagonistic to the interests of the Government, when that Government desired or required any part of such domain.

                Mr. Kinney is at a loss to understand why “General Connor should locate his camp within the limits of a peaceful and loyal city,” and why he “did not occupy Camp Crittenden.”  In reply, I have to say that Camp Douglas is on the public domain, at least two miles distant from the nearest house in the city.  It was selected o account of its salubrious and convenient site and abundance of water.  The alleged annoyance to the citizens, from the fact that one of the several streams running through or near the city is rendered filthy by the presence of the troops, is greatly exaggerated, and is, in my opinion, an excuse for, rather than a well founded cause of, complaint.  My reasons for locating the camp were, at the time of location, and still are, regarded as good and sufficient.  First, it was and is desirable that the camp should be at some central point in the district where supplies of forage could be most advantageously procured, and whence roads diverge in all directions – north, south, east, and west.  These advantages could best be secured at its present location.  Second, I deemed it not only prudent, but absolutely necessary to the respect due to, and the dignity of, the Government, that the camp should be located and maintained in the immediate vicinity of the headquarters of Brigham Young and his attendant nest of traitors.

                Previous to my arrival I was not only informed, but it was bruited about in every direction among the people, that the forces under my command – soldiers marching to the relief and for the protection of the Territory – would not be permitted to cross the Jordan, on the west.  This threat, publicly given out, I subsequently found to have been intended as an intimidation, with a view to stopping the command at Fort Crittenden.  How much the desire of speculators to sell to Government the buildings at the latter point at exorbitant rates had to do with the origin of the threat, I deem it unnecessary here to argue.

                Mr. Kinney overstates the fact very considerably when he dwells on the loyalty and peacefulness of the people of Utah.  They are bound down by a system of church tyranny more complete than that which held the bondmen of ancient Rome in early days, or now enthralls Afric’s sons on the cotton fields of the South.  The world has never seen a system of bondage, abject slavery, espionage, and constant, unintermitting tyranny in the most trivial relations in life, more galling than that with which Brigham Young oppresses the people in the name of religion.  His teachings, and those of his elders, all tend to impress disloyalty upon the minds of his subjects and antagonism towards the Government, in which he recognizes neither authority over him nor goodness in itself.

                Until my arrival and location in his immediate presence, his pulpit harangues were but iterated and reiterated denunciations of the Union and outbursts of bold-faced treason.  Even now he and his chosen apostles, the minions of himself and the teachers of the people, can hardly conceal their inborn treason or repress the traitorous words which fill their hearts and break upon the ear in illy concealed sneers and covert insinuations against the Government which fosters and protects them in their iniquities.

                As a specimen of the loyalty and patriotism of the man from whom this people receive their ideas, as well of religion as of morality and the Government of the United States, I quote a brief paragraph from one of the so called sermons of Brigham Young, delivered in presence of the assembled multitude on the sixth of October, 1863, at the Bowery, in Salt Lake City, to the semi-annual conference then in session, viz.:

                “As for those who Abraham Lincoln has sent here, if they meddle with our domestic affairs I will send them to hell across lots; and as for those apostates running around here, they will probably fall down and their bowels will gush out, or they will bleed somewhere else.”

                A sermon as remarkable for its innate treason, villainous hatred of the Government, and extreme vulgarity as it is for its grammatical construction.   Were it not that these words, as used by the chief priest of the church, are susceptible of the most complete and overwhelming proof, it would pass credence that they were ever uttered by any man, however debased, in any pulpit in the land.

                Taught, led, governed, tyrannized over by such men, by means of the most perfect system, extending throughout the whole people, and down into the deepest recesses of every-day private and domestic life, covered with the thin gauze of a superstition called religion, unparalleled in the history of the world, and a disgrace at once to the civilization of the nineteenth century and the free institutions of the land, it is not to be wondered at that the people, ignorant and deluded, should have attained a state of feeling not merely inimical to the Government, but bordering on treason, only suppressed for the time by the presence of troops or the personal fears of the wily, traitorous, and treacherous leaders.

                When, therefore, Mr. Delegate Kinney affects patriotism himself and with persecuted air and earnest professions characterizes the people of Utah as either loyal or peaceful, he but excites a smile upon the lip of even the casual passer through this land of polygamy, treason, and kindred crimes.

                I beg to assure the department that the presence of the troops, both in the Territory and on the present Government reservation at Camp Douglas, has done much to prevent treasonable outbursts and conflict with this peculiar people, and is doing much, in a quiet way, to lead the community back to allegiance to, and proper respect and regard for, the Government.  Brigham Young has impiously sworn and prophesied that the troops should either be destroyed or removed from Camp Douglas, and should the department intervene to remove the troops, not only would it not commend Government to the mass of the people, but it would serve to strengthen his power and fulfill his prophesies.  Not only would such a course be injurious to the Government itself, but the transfer of the troops would be regarded by thousands of the citizens suffering under a worse than Egyptian bondage as a withdrawal of the last ray of hope and an abandonment of them to their hard fate.

                That their condition has been much alleviated since the arrival of troops I have the strongest and best reasons for believing, and many look forward eagerly and hopefully to the time when the power of the Government shall be felt, or the incoming of a new population may release them from a galling despotism and restore them to their long lost rights as American citizens.

                I have had recent evidence of the boasted loyality of these people in the return of an expedition sent to the South for the protection of miners.  The officer in charge, Lieutenant John Quinn, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, in his official report, states that in many places not only could he not obtain forage for his animals at any price, the people asseverating that they would not sell a grain to Uncle Sam’s minions, but he was absolutely prohibited from entering their farm houses or seeking shelter from the winter’s storms in barns, sheds, or outhouses.

                I have also learned from credible witnesses that, in cases not few or exceptional, mercantile merchants and travelers visiting the southern settlements to purchase flour and grain are invariably asked if they are buying for the troops, with the declaration of farmers that, if so, grain and flour would not be sold at any price.  The mere suspicion of being an agent of the Government in search of supplies is sufficient to violate any contract previously made, and debar the purchaser from obtaining a bushel of wheat, or a sack of flour, or other produce.

                I inclose, for the information of the department (marked A), a certified copy of a communication just received by me from miners, citizens of the United States, wintering in the neighboring town of Franklin, near the northern border of the Territory.

                I need hardly say that the utmost protection will be afforded them should it be required; but it is surely an anomalous position of affairs that citizens of the United States, peacefully seeking the settlements of a Territory of their common country, and that common Territory professing, through its Delegate, loyalty and patriotism, merely asking the hospitality accorded to humanity, should be compelled to look for protection from the armed troops of the Union.  The hypocrisy of claiming either loyalty or peacefulness for such a people is too palpable to require further comment.

                In reference to the special order directing estray cattle found on the reserve to be shot, which is complained of by Mr. Kinney as emanating from me, the department is respectfully informed that the same was issued by Colonel Pollock, commanding Camp Douglas, and immediately on coming to my notice it was revoked by me, and has not, in a single instance, been executed.

                The department is informed that Mr. Kinney is mistaken in the assertion that this command is subsisted to any considerable extent from “the products of the soil of the Territory.”  Our subsistence supplies are entirely drawn from the East, except only flour, beef, and vegetables, for which articles we are now paying exorbitant rates, induced and purposely made so by the edict of Brigham to his people not to sell to the troops.  In this manner have the contractors (Gentiles) been broken up and forced out of the field of supplying, and Brigham, himself, or his chosen bishops, derive the profits from the enormous and unreasonable prices demanded and necessarily paid.

                For the same reasons the hay and wood contractors have been unable to fulfill their contracts, and the troops were compelled to go into the mountains twenty miles distant, in the dead of winter, to cut and transport timber for fuel, while the animals, from sheer necessity, have all been turned out to exist upon the light herbage to be found on snow-clad hills and wintry plains.  In consequence of this, not only have the troops at times suffered for want of fuel, but the cavalry has necessarily been dismounted, and many of our animals have perished for lack of food, when it is a conceded and well known fact that there is an abundance of forage in the Territory, for which the contractors have in vain offered the most exorbitant rates.

                After this statement of facts bearing on the subject, I deem it my duty to the Government and the country to add that would regard it as extremely injudicious and impolite in every sense for the department to comply with the request of Mr. Delegate Kinney, and it would only do so under the most decided and earnest, yet respectful, protest on my part.

                In conclusion, I may be permitted to add that, while an order transferring either myself or my command to the active scenes of the East would but be responsive to my own and the universal heartfelt desire of the troops under me, I must beg leave, respectfully, to suggest that neither they nor I have constituted Mr. Kinney our spokesman, and with a proper appreciation of his unasked for interposition to that end, and a due respect for the position he holds, would prefer communicating our wishes, on proper occasion through some other and probably more congenial channel..

                                I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, U.S.Volunteers, Commanding District.

HENRY W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief, Washington, D.C.

 

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[Copy of telegram]

CAMP DOUGLAS, July 13, 1864.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

                Encouraged by the unfavorable news from the East, the Mormons are assuming a very hostile attitude.  They have about one thousand men under arms, and are still assembling, and threaten to drive my Provost Guard from the city; alleged excuse for armed demonstration, the presence of the Provost Guard in the city.  My command is much scattered, having only three hundred men at this camp.  If conflict takes place, which I will endeavor to avoid, can hold my position until reinforced from neighboring Territories.

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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[Copy of telegram.]

CAMP DOUGLAS, July 15, 1864.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

                Finding that I am preparing to resist any attack, and knowing that the city is at the mercy of my guns, and will be surely destroyed if my troops are attacked, the Mormons seem to be quieting down somewhat.  Although armed forces are assembling inside of Brigham’s yard, and having nightly drills with artillery and infantry, my impression is that there is no immediate probability of conflict.  The excitement is dying away among the masses of the people, still in many parts of the Territory the national currency is openly repudiated under the dictation of the Church.

                The leaders are buying up from the emigrants and others all the arms and ammunition possible.

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

 

 

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[Copy of telegram.]

SALT LAKE CITY, July 16, 1864.

Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

                The excitement is fast abating; any indication of weakness or vacillation on my part would precipitate trouble.  The presence of the Provost Guard was simply the excuse for the development of the inate and persistent disloyalty of the church leaders, who seek to force me into some position which will secure my removal and a consequent overthrow of my policy in Utah.  The removal of the Provost Guard, under the circumstances, would be disastrous in the extreme.  My opinion is decided that a firm front presented to their armed demonstrations will alone secure peace and counteract the machinations of the traitor leaders of this fanatical and deluded people.

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

 SAN FRANCISCO, July 16, 1864.

Brig.-Gen. P.E. CONNOR, Commanding District of Utah:

                GENERAL:  I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of July first, reporting the peaceable state of affairs in your district, and of July second, reporting the determination of a few Salt Lake merchants to initiate a forced change in the currency of the Territory, and requesting the instruction of the Department Commander in relation to the course you should take in this matter; it having been your first impulse to crush out at once and forever so unpatriotic and suicidal a policy.  Soon after the receipt of these letters came your telegrams of the thirteenth, received last night, and of the fifteenth, received to-day, reporting a threatened insurrection on the part of the Mormons, on the alleged pretext of the presence of the Provost Guard in Salt Lake City.  Last night I telegraphed you in answer to yours of the thirteenth, as follows:

                “The Major-General commanding the department approves of your determination to avoid a conflict with the Mormons.  Do so by all means.  Is there not some other cause than the mere presence of the guard in the city?  Examine closely.  Remove the guard and troops rather than their presence should cost a war.”

                The Major-General commanding directs me to say that he has every confidence in your discretion and good judgment, as he has in your zeal and ability, and is certain he will not have to appeal to these high qualities in vain.

                The condition of affairs at Salt Lake, as reported by you, is very critical, not only as regards your own command, but as regards this department and the whole country.

                The question is, are we at this time, and as we are now situated, in a condition to undertake to carry on a war against the Mormons, for any cause whatever, if it can possibly be avoided; not whether there are not matters that require to be changed, bad government and worse morals to be corrected, and the authority of the National Government to be more thoroughly enforced; but can we not pass all these by for the present, at least, and thus avoid weakening the general Government, now taxed to its utmost, and struggling for its very existence.

                Your forces are very few and scattered – so the General finds those in the other districts – so undoubtedly will be found those in the Territories adjoining you.  To send you the forces necessary to resist the Mormons, much more to assail them, would require more means and men than could be gathered together and sent to you from this coast; to send away those which could be had would leave it in the hands of Secessionists, and that at a time when the inhabitants are looking with anxiety to the troubled and critical state of foreign affairs.

                A war with the Mormons would be the opportunity which our domestic enemies would not fail to improve, and it is not too much to say that at this time such a war would prove fatal to the Union cause in this department.  Under these circumstances, the Major-General considers that it is the course of true patriotism for you not to embark in any hostilities, nor suffer yourself to be drawn into any course which will lead to hostilities.

                It is infinitely better that you should, under the present circumstances, avoid contact with them.  The object of troops being at this time in Utah is to protect the overland route, and not to endeavor to correct the evil conduct, manifest as it is, of the inhabitants of that Territory.  This undoubtedly will tax your forbearance and your prudence to the utmost, but the General trusts it will not do so in vain.

                At this distance the General is unable to give you specific instructions as to the particular things to be done or to be avoided, and must necessarily leave the details in your hands.

                To insure this dispatch reaching you it is sent by the hands of that excellent officer, Major McGarry, whom you will retain, if you require him, at the headquarters of his regiment.  He is informed of the contents of this dispatch so that he may communicate them in case he has to destroy it.  It would be well, however, if they were kept by you in strict confidence.  A telegraphic cipher is also sent.

                                Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

R.C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH, CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH,

NEAR GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, July 2, 1864.

                COLONEL:  I have the honor to inform the Department Commander that I have recently become cognizant of a persistent effort on the part of a few merchants and traders doing business in Great Salt Lake City to institute a forced change in the currency of the Territory, viz.: from National Treasury notes to gold coin.

                Without knowing whether the movement had its origin in a desire to depreciate the national currency, and to this extent weaken the arm of government, or in the selfish greed for gain, or, as is most probable, both combined, my first impulse was to arrest the originators on the first overt act to that end, and crush out at once and forever so unpatriotic and suicidal a policy.  I have, however, on reflection, deemed it proper to submit the facts to the Department Commander, and ask for specific instructions on the subject should the attempt be actually made.  You are respectfully informed that up to this time the only currency of the Territory has been that established by the Government – legal tender notes – and notwithstanding the product of the northern mines in dust, there is not sufficient gold and silver coin in the Territory to suffice for one day’s need in commerce, trade, or barter.

                The only effect of the forcible measures threatened to be inaugurated by the merchants would therefore be to depreciate to an enormous extent the current value of the national currency, and disseminate among a suspicious people the opinion that the Government was fast going to pieces, and its pledged securities little better than blank paper.

                The efforts of bad men among them to sneer at the impotence of the Government, and depreciate it in any manner would be furthered, and our great nation become a byword and reproach among a deluded community, already deeply inoculated with enmity and disloyalty towards it.

                In almost every other community the inevitable laws of trade would check and prevent the inauguration of so suicidal a policy as that indicated under the circumstances existing in this Territory, but it is greatly to be feared that unless some stringent measures are authorized, a very few disloyal and greedy merchants, owing, but neither feeling any allegiance to nor regard for the nation, may consummate a most disastrous stroke in the forcible change of the currency.  The whole matter is respectfully submitted to the Department Commander for early instructions, by telegraph, if deemed advisable.

                                I remain, Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General,Commanding.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Acting Adjutant-General.

 

 

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UTAH, CAMP DOUGLAS, UTAH,

NEAR GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, July 24, 1864.

                COLONEL:  I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, at the hands of Major McGarry, Second Cavalry, California Volunteers, of your dispatch of the sixteenth instant, communicating to me the views of the Major-General commanding the department, in reference to present and future Mormon complications in Utah, and also your favor of same date inclosing a telegraphic cipher.  Last night I telegraphed you as follows:

                “McGarry has arrived; all quiet.  The wishes of the commanding General will be strictly complied with.  With the addition of three or four more companies from Fort Churchill I will be responsible for the protection of the overland mail and the peaceable solution of the Mormon question.  I am aware how difficult it must be, even after the fullest exposition in writing, for one at a distance to fully comprehend the state of affairs existing in this Territory, and I feel sensible of the high honor done me by the commanding General, in his expressions of reliance on my judgment and discretion.  At the same time I am thankful for the very full exposition you have given me of the views of the commanding General, and take this occasion to repeat that they shall be implicitly observed by me, with the confident hope that nothing shall occur, in my power to prevent, which will cause him to feel that his reliance in me has been misplaced.

                “For manifest reasons, some of the acts performed by me or things done may at a distance appear a deviation from the peaceful policy which is at once my own aim and the desire of the General commanding, but I beg leave respectfully to assure you that those acts have been at times absolutely necessary to insure peace, and certainly always, in my judgment, calculated to promote it.  The commanding General, by this time, I presume, fully understands that, in case of a foreign war the overland mail would stand in far more danger from the Mormons than from the Indians or other foes, and to protect that route it is necessary that the former should understand most fully that there is not only the intention, but there is also the power to hold them in check.  The presence of the troops here, while giving no just cause of offense, and without infringing in the least upon the rights of any citizen, is potent to prevent difficulties and obstructions which would assuredly result in war.

                “The exhibition of firmness and determination, accompanied by a display of force, will, I am confident, secure peace and prevent complications.  Such addition to my present command as has been asked for, and which I hope is in the power of the General commanding to give, I am confident will enable me to do all that is necessary, and I have no hesitation in pledging myself to the maintenance of peace in Utah without compromising the dignity of my Government or pandering in the least to the threats or expostulations of the treasonable organization which holds so great a sway in this Territory.

                “So long as my guns command the city as they do, and the force under my command is not too much reduced, I have no fear, and will be responsible for the result.  Brigham Young will not commence hostilities, I think, and I need hardly say that I will not inaugurate them so long as peace is possible without dishonor.  I trust that I fully appreciate the anxiety with which the commanding General, in view of the circumstances surrounding him, regards the possibility of conflict in this Territory, and so appreciating, I need hardly add that nothing will be done by me tending to complicate the undoubtedly bad state of affairs existing here.”

                                I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. EDWARD CONNOR,

Brigadier-General,Commanding.

Lieut.-Col. R.C. DRUM, Assistant  Adjutant-General, U.S. Army, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.

 

            The muster rolls and monthly returns of this regiment contain no remarks giving the record of events of the different companies, therefore it is impossible to write a complete history of it.

            The following are the different stations occupied by the headquarters and various companies, as gleaned from the muster rolls and monthly returns:

 

HEADQUARTERS

 

            Was stationed in Stockton from the date of organization to December, 1861, when it was moved to Benicia Barracks, where it remained until June, 1862.  During July and August it was en route to Fort Ruby, Nevada, where it arrived some time during September.

            The records do not show how long it remained at Fort Ruby, but early in January it was at Camp Douglas, where it remained until finally mustered out, July 27, 1866.

 

COMPANY A

 

            Was organized at Stockton, October 31, 1861, and went to Benicia Barracks in December, 1861.  During July and August, 1862, it was en route to Salt Lake City.  July tenth it was at Camp Halleck, near Stockton; July thirty-first at Carson City, Nev.; September thirtieth at Fort Ruby, Nev.; in February and March, 1863, at Fort Churchill, Nev., and in January, 1864, at Camp Douglas, where it was stationed until June, 1865.  It then went to Denver City, Col., where it remained until October, when it returned to Camp Douglas, where it was finally mustered out, July 27, 1866.

 

COMPANY B

 

            Was organized in Stockton, October 31, 1861.  It went to Fort Seward, in Humboldt County, Cal., some time during the month of December, 1861.  July 10, 1862, it was at Camp Halleck, near Stockton.  From February, 1863, to June, 1863, it was at Camp Union, near Sacramento.  June 30, 1863, it was at Fort Churchill, Nev.  During the following month it went to Fort Ruby, Nev., where it remained until October, 1864, when it returned to Camp Union, Cal., where the original members, whose terms of service had expired, were mustered out.  The company was then filled up, reorganized, and sent back to Camp Douglas, where it remained from November, 1864, to June, 1865.  It then went to Denver City, Col., where it remained until October, when it returned to Camp Douglas, and was stationed there until its final muster out, July 27, 1866.

 

COMPANY C

 

            This company was organized at Benicia, December 31, 1861.  It immediately went to Fort Bragg, Humboldt County, Cal., where it remained until the spring of 1862.  Then it went to Fort Ruby, Nev., where it remained until August or September, 1863, when it moved to Camp Douglas.  It was at the latter post until October, 1864.  It then went to Camp Connor, or Conness, in Idaho Territory, returning to Camp Douglas in May, 1865, and remained there until its final muster out, July 27, 1866.

 

COMPANY D

 

            This company was organized at Stockton, October 31, 1861, and at once took station at Fort Gaston, Humboldt County, Cal.  In the spring of 1862 it returned, and was stationed at Camp Union until the summer of 1863.  It then went to Camp Douglas, Utah, where it remained until its consolidation with Company C, on December 9, 1865.

 

COMPANY E

 

            Was organized at Benicia, December 21, 1861.  During the summer of 1862 it went to Nevada and Utah, and was stationed at Camp Douglas and Fort Ruby until its disbandment by consolidation, November 1, 1864.

 

COMPANY F

 

            This company was organized at Benicia, on the twelfth day of December, 1861.  It went to Fort Ruby, Nev., in the summer of 1862.  In the spring of 1864 it marched to Camp Douglas, where it remained until it was disbanded by consolidation, November 1, 1864.

 

COMPANY G

 

            Was organized at Benicia Barracks, on the ninth day of December, 1861.  It remained at Benicia until the spring of 1862.  It then marched to Camp Douglas, Utah, where it was stationed until it was disbanded by consolidation, November 1, 1864.

 

COMPANY H

 

            This company was organized at Benicia Barracks, December 12, 1861.  During the spring or summer of 1862 it went to Utah, and took station at Camp Douglas.  How long it remained there is not known, but in May, 1863, it was at Camp Connor, Idaho, where it remained until it was disbanded by consolidation, at Camp Douglas, November 1, 1864.

 

COMPANY I

 

            Was organized at Stockton, November 26, 1861.  During the month of December it was moved to Benicia Barracks, where it remained until the summer of 1862, when it went to Fort Bridger, Wy.T. (then part of Utah), remaining there until August, 1864, when it marched to Camp Douglas, where it was disbanded by consolidation, November 1, 1864.

 

COMPANY K

 

            Was organized at Stockton, December 3, 1861.  It moved to Benicia Barracks in the same month, and went to Utah, with the balance of the regiment, during the summer of 1862, and was stationed at Camp Douglas during the remainder of its term of service, being disbanded by consolidation, November 1, 1864.  It took part in the battle of Bear River, in January, 1863, for an account of which see history of Second Cavalry.

 

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